What is the difference between Class A Class B and Class C contractor?

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What is the difference between Class A, Class B and Class C contractor?

 

The California Contractors State License Board (CSLB) has issued licenses to individuals who want to become contractors in three general classifications: Class A – General Engineering Contractor; B- Building contractor and C–Specialty or “of which there are currently 42 different types.” This means that each classification requires its own set of rules, regulations & guidelines.

 

What is the difference between Class A Class B and Class C contractor?

 

Class A– General Engineering Contractors may only enter into direct contracts and subcontracts for projects requiring specialized engineering knowledge, skills or abilities. They are also allowed to self perform work that falls within their license classification

The general engineer’s power extends beyond just designing buildings—they can do everything from putting up scaffolding at an construction site all the way down ensuring pipes stay intact during installation

Class B– General Building Contractors are unique in that they can enter into direct contracts and subcontracts with clients involving:  1) Projects limited to framing or carpentry only; 2) Two unrelated trades other than those listed above (i e., not counting towards the total).

Class C – A special kind of contractor, Class C contractors have the ability to enter into direct contracts and subcontracts for projects that require their particular skillset. They’re not limited however as they can also self-perform work which falls within license classification or is supplemental enough so it doesn’t conflict with what’s being done elsewhere on site at any given time (incidental).

 

In addition, unlike both a Class A – General Engineering Contractor and a Class C – Specialty Contractor, a Class B – General Building Contractor may self-perform any work (even work not involving framing or carpentry) except for work for which a C-16 – Fire Protection or C-57 Well Drilling Contractor’s licenses would be required.

 

 

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Nancy Lynne Tannehill

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